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  • Writer's pictureHolly Wild

Anatomy Pressure Points

Updated: May 16, 2023


Anatomy Pressure Points
Anatomy Pressure Points


Pressure points are specific points on the body that are sensitive to pressure and can be used for therapeutic or self-defense purposes. Here is a breakdown of some of the commonly recognized pressure points in the anatomy:


Temporal region: The temple area on the sides of the head, just above the ears, is a pressure point that can be used for relief of tension headaches.


Nasal bone: The bridge of the nose is a pressure point that can be used to control bleeding from the nose.


Eyes: The area around the eyes, particularly the spot just below the eyebrow, is a pressure point that can be used for pain relief and to relieve tension headaches.


Neck: There are several pressure points on the neck that can be used for self-defense or control, including the carotid sinus, the jugular notch, and the base of the skull.


Chest: The solar plexus, located in the center of the chest, is a pressure point that can be used for self-defense and can cause pain and incapacitation when struck.


Forearm: The wrist, particularly the radial artery located on the inside of the wrist, is a pressure point that can be used for self-defense or to control bleeding.


Hand: There are several pressure points on the hand that can be used for self-defense, including the webbing between the thumb and index finger and the center of the palm.


Abdomen: The abdominal region contains several pressure points that can be used for self-defense or control, including the rib cage, the floating ribs, and the navel.


Leg: The thigh, particularly the femoral artery located on the inside of the thigh, is a pressure point that can be used for self-defense or to control bleeding.


It's important to note that pressure points should only be used for therapeutic or self-defense purposes by trained professionals or under the guidance of a healthcare professional. Improper use of pressure points can result in injury or other adverse effects.


Reference / Citations:


  1. PubMed: www.pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov

  2. Google Scholar: scholar.google.com

  3. ResearchGate: www.researchgate.net

  4. The Cochrane Library: www.cochranelibrary.com

  5. National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI): www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov

  6. New York Pain Doctors: www.newyorpaindoctors.com (NYPMD)

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